Perils Of Prohibition

Perils Of Prohibition

At eighteen years of age, a person can die fighting for their country, but cannot drink alcohol. The article found in Newsweek, May 1995, ?Perils of Prohibition? , discusses this fact. Further, author Elizabeth Whelan talks about the effects of ?binge? drinking at college and in high schools, and why the drinking age should be lowered to eighteen years old. She gives many insights, compares the U.S. to Europe where the drinking age can be as low as 12, and shows many good ideas on how to regulate teen drinking. I agree with Elizabeth Whelan?s positions on lowering the drinking age in her article ?Perils of Prohibition?, that the drinking age should be eighteen.
Whelan discusses why people should be able to drink at a lowered age of eighteen by showing all of the things that her eighteen year old daughter, Christine, is allowed to do at that age. ?Christine and her classmates can drive cars, fly planes, marry, vote, pay taxes, take out loans, and risk their lives as members of the U.S. armed forces.? (Whelan, 14). Under federal law, at eighteen we are consenting adults, and we are legally responsible for our actions. So why are we

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